Time for a change.

A new header to celebrate new beginnings!

The wonderful city of Edinburgh. I can’t imagine why it has taken me so long to come and live in the capital city of this magnificent country.

This has been a year of considerable change for both me and for the profession with which I have been so closely linked (despite never having been a member!) for most of my life.

For me the changes have been mostly positive. Certainly moving to Edinburgh feels like being granted a new lease of life. People still value their public library service here. A recent news report shows that, even with austerity, libraries in the capital are welcoming increasing numbers of visitors through their doors. I sense a greater feeling of optimism here than seems to exist south of the border – it seems to me that for the thirty years I’ve been working with Scottish libraries this has almost always has been the case.

But there’s no room for complacency here. Librarians here face the same challenges as their English counterparts. But the SNP is actively fighting to save libraries in Scotland and, like Plaid Cymru with its vision for the future of the service in Wales, has an altogether more positive and less fragmented view of their future than anything being brokered by English political parties.

So a mark in the ‘plus’ column for moving to Scotland!

In other news…

Despite having been mired in RFID for the greater part of the last six years I have retained an active interest in library systems. Since 2013 I have had the pleasure to be asked to advise on library management system (LMS) projects in both Scotland and Ireland – the latter culminating in the drafting of the specification and much of the business case for their national LMS procurement. Quite a refreshing change from ISO standards and self-service kiosk design! So much so that I recently closed down my company – Library RFID Ltd – and am now in the process of rebuilding that website to more accurately reflect my current activities.

Whilst I am still keenly interested in RFID I have become increasingly frustrated at the lack of ambition of both suppliers and consumers for developing the potential of the technology – particularly for mobile applications – and am consciously changing the emphasis of both this blog and my website in an effort to change this state of affairs.

Inspired by meetings earlier in the year with smartphone and tablet app developers in both the commercial sector and the universities, where new uses for NFC and RFID in libraries are already being planned, I think it’s definitely time to start building the foundations of the next generation of more mobile and agile library systems. A view that I hope will resonate with both the CEO of the recently-created library task force, Kathy Settle and the Arts Council’s Brian Ashley, both of whom were kind enough to find the time to meet with me over the summer.

I don’t believe anyone wants to recreate the kind of proprietary, fragmented solutions that prevented the RFID library market in the UK from functioning effectively for much of the first ten years or so of its development. The SCL’s efforts to create a single digital platform – assisted by consultants from Canadian application provider BiblioCommons – is I think a clear recognition of the lack of any kind of cohesion in existing library system provision. The Welsh and Irish decisions to implement a single supplier solution represent – in my opinion – another example of what happens when consumer patience runs out. I hope both succeed in improving matters but I am more than a little concerned that both solutions are fighting the last war rather than anticipating the future.

In my view there are no ‘silver bullet’ solutions and very few tech-savvy library systems specialists left in the public sector to assess the efficacy of the solutions being proposed – but I would say that, wouldn’t I?

In a effort to try and do something positive I’ve recently agreed to work with Ken Chad and some other equally talented library people (not necessarily librarians Steven!) in building a new model for systems procurement for libraries to replace the existing core specification originally created by former colleague Juliet Leeves back in the 1980s. Events elsewhere having unexpectedly given me some time to spare over the coming months.

Another ‘plus’ for library technology development!

Sadly for me there was one sad moment in all this excitement. In March Book Industry Communication (BIC) decided to make changes to the structure of its committees and working groups to better reflect the wishes of its membership which has ultimately ended my fifteen year relationship with the Library Committee. I hope we achieved some useful outcomes during my time – not least the adoption of a national data model for RFID use.

I am, for the moment, still actively engaged in promoting the Library Communication Framework – a project I initially proposed back in 2011 – but only until a librarian can be found to take over. I wish them and BIC well – and thanks for all your support.

Just one small tick in the minus box then.

Onward and upward… (Edinburgh  streets offer no other alternative!)

Have a view? Please share!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.